Cookie Balls (aka What to do With Soft Cookies)

I made cookies the other day (shocking, I know). When they first came out of the oven, they were quite tasty, almost like mini cakes, but as they cooled they turned into crumbly messes. Sad and confused, I wondered what to do with these messy little failures.

Then I thought, you know what makes everything better? Chocolate! Yes, chocolate makes emotional wounds better, as well as all sorts of food.

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Chocolate Covered Cookie Balls

  • approx. 10 large soft cookies
  • approx. 1/2 c nut butter (I used peanut butter)
  • 1/2 c Semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 2 tsp Canola oil

In a medium bowl, mix with a spoon (or your hands, that’s what I did):

  • 10 large soft cookies
  • 1/4 c nut butter

Add more nut butter as needed until mixture can be squished into 1″ balls and not fall apart.

Place 1″ cookie balls on a plate or some other flat surface, I recommend using parchment paper or other non-stick mechanism between the cookie balls and the plate. Put plate in the fridge for about 10 minutes.

In a double broiler, melt

  • 1/2 c semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 2 tsp canola oil (the canola oil will keep the chocolate soft at room temperature, instead of it turning into a hard shell)

Pull cookie balls out of the fridge and move them to one side of the plate. Dip and roll each cookie ball in the melted chocolate until it is completely covered, then place back on the other side of the plate. When all are coated, return to the fridge for another 15 min or until the chocolate coating is hard.

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And that’s it! How to turn a baking mistake into a delicious chocolate covered cookie ball.

Don’t have a soft cookie recipe? My applesauce snickerdoodles will work decently. Oh, you want a vegan recipe? How convenient! I just happen to have a way too soft vegan applesauce snickerdoodle recipe handy.

Too-Soft Vegan Applesauce Snickerdoodles

Mix together thoroughly …

  • 1/4 + 1/8 cup melted vegan butter
  • 1/2 + 1/8 cup brown sugar
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1 Ener-G egg

Sift together and stir in …

  • 2 cup bread flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp cream of tartar
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Sugar Mixture

  • 2 tbsp white sugar
  • 2 tsp cinnamon 

Chill dough (required). Roll into balls the size of walnuts. Then roll each ball in the sugar mixture before placing about 2 inches apart on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake at 400ºF until lightly browned but still soft, approximately 8 – 10 minutes.

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I used candycane bits instead of cinnamon sugar for this batch — it was season-appropriate at the time, I swear!

 

These cookies really weren’t that great as cookies, so consider yourself warned. I promise I will post a vegan applesauce snickerdoodle recipe as soon as I come with one!

Happy baking!

What are your fixes for baking mishaps?

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Black Forest Cookies

It’s that moment we’ve all been waiting for…a new cookie recipe! Took me long enough, I know, but life has been surprisingly busy lately (I wonder why). But last night the urge to bake hit me and out came something delicious. And, applesauce-ified.

 

This recipe is based on the Joy of Cooking’s chocolate chip cookie recipe, modified to be a bit healthier and, of course, the addition of cocoa and cherries.

Black Forest Cookies

Whisk together:

  • 1 c plus 2 tbsp all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda

Beat in a large bowl until well blended:

  • 1/4 c unsalted butter
  • 1/2 c packed brown sugar

Add and beat until well combined:

  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • 1/2 c unsweetened applesauce

Stir in the flour mixture until well blended and smooth, then stir in:

  • 2 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 c chocolate chips

Grease a cookie sheet and drop the dough by heaping spoonfuls about 2 inches apart.

Now take out an equivalent number of maraschino cherries (my batch made 19 cookies) and squeeze them between some paper towel to get the excess liquid out. Push one cherry into the center of each cookie.

 

Bake for about 10 minutes at 375°F, until cookies spring back when poked OR a toothpick inserted comes out clean (except for chocolate chips, of course).

So, how were they? Extremely tasty! They have that same cake-y texture as most of the applesauce substitute cookies I have tried, but don’t seem to have that baking soda flavour. The dough itself is not very sweet, but the cookies (and cherries) definitely make up for it.

Enjoy!

P.S. I love feedback! If you make one of my recipes, please leave me a comment saying what you thought of it!

Finally!

Well, it took me several months, but I finally did it. There is finally a custom header on the blog. From the very start I thought, hey, that top image is temporary, I’ll replace it with something soon. But soon became a week and then a month and then…now!

Feedback is welcome–I kind of like the green, (mostly because the tea towel–believe it or not, the nicest one we have) is also green, so it doesn’t clash.

The is taken of some cookies I made this last weekend. After my success with banana bread, I thought “hey, why not banana cookies?”. So I turned to my faithful friend, allrecipes, and found healthy banana cookies! It’s a different kind of cookie — no dairy, no eggs, no flour. I was worried they might be like granola bars, but they’re a bit too soft for that. I did make some modifications, mostly based on the comments.

I added:

  • 2 diced apples
  • 1/2 more oats
  • applesauce instead of the oil
  • 1/4 c shredded coconut
  • 1/3 c maple syrup
  • 1/3 c fresh blackberries

I also cookies them at the suggested lower temperature of 325°F. One thing that was weird about these cookies was I had a great deal of difficulty telling when they were done. They get slightly brown, but mostly they just get harder. And, of course, with no rising agents, they don’t get bigger, either. What’s the verdict? They need chocolate. But other than that, very tasty!

Enjoy!

More Applesauce Adventures

Well, having had several batches of Snickerdoodles, specifically applesauce flavoured ones, I find myself temporarily bored with them. So when we (Tristan and I) went to make oatmeal chocolate chip cookies last night, I was initially willing to just make regular cookies. But then I saw the 1 cup of butter, and 1 3/4 cups of sugar….and I just couldn’t do it. Out came the applesauce! We debated for awhile over how to change the ingredients. In the end we replaced 1/2 c butter, 1/4 c white sugar, and 3/4 c brown sugar, with just one cup of applesauce. (We did increase the chocolate chips by 1/2 c as well…but chocolate is way better than extra butter or sugar.)

Here’s the final recipe:

Whisk together:

  • 1 3/4 c all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Beat in a large bowl until well blended:

  • 1/2 c unsalted butter, softened
  • 3/4 c packed brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3 tsp vanilla
  • 3/4 c unsweetened applesauce

Stir in the flour mixture. Stir in:

  • 1 1/2 c semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 3 1/2 c rolled oats

Heat oven to 350. Grease the pan(s). Make into 1″ round balls, about 1.5″ apart. Bake until cookies are lightly browned all over, 12 to 14 minutes. Let stand briefly, then remove to a rack to cool.

The cookies are surprisingly non-apple-y, so that was a nice change from the snickerdoodles. They are pretty tasty, though it may be partially due to the high chocolate density. Also, we didn’t have rolled oats, so we used large flake quick oats instead. Unfortunately, the cookies turned out a little bit on the dry side; and, once again, they were very cake-y in texture.

I was very perplexed with all the cake-i-ness from the previous snickerdoodle experiments, so I did a bit of research(Thanks, Cooking for Geeks!) Anyway, what it came down to was things that produce air (acid base reactions) and things that trap the air in. Baking soda is a base, so it reacts with any acids in the dough to produce air. Flour (gluten) traps it in. What adding applesauce does, is not only does it distribute the reactants (baking soda and acids) better–it also adds more acid itself. (Baking powder is a self-contained reaction, it contains balanced amounts of acid and base.) The baking powder in this recipe was already reduced from 3/4 tsp to 1/4 tsp.

The next try will likely be to cut out all the baking powder, and reduce the baking soda as well. As for the dryness, it looks like cutting out a bit of flour may also be in order.

Enjoy!

Sarah

Applesauce Snickerdoodles – Take 2

So, I tried it all again, this time adding more applesauce. I made a double batch, and cooked some up right away. As per last time, batter was quite sticky, and the cookies had a very cake-y consistency. Very strong apple flavour, as well. The second batch, however, got refridgerated for a few days, and ended up quite different. These cookies were denser and had a much less overwhelming taste of applesauce.

Overall, I’d say they were much more Snickerdoodle-y. So, yay! For fun, I had a bunch of dough left over in the second batch, and I smushed it altogether in a 8″ square pan, ending up with this:

Interestingly, it had a more cake-y texture again, so perhaps it is also related to the size of the cookie (i.e. smaller cookie = denser).

I’m going to call this experiment successful! So the final recipe is:

Applesauce Snickerdoodles

Mix together thoroughly …

  • 1/4 + 1/8 cup butter
  • 1/2 + 1/8 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1 egg

Sift together and stir in …

  • 2 cup sifted flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp cream of tartar
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Sugar Mixture

  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 2 tsp cinnamon

Chill dough (only optional if you want more cake-y texture). Roll into balls the size of walnuts. Then roll each ball in the sugar mixture before placing about 2 inches apart on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake at 400ºF until lightly browned but still soft, approximately 10 minutes.

I’ve been having the urge to make both banana bread and red velvet cake lately, so perhaps the next adventure will be to mix the two.

Sarah

Applesauce Snickerdoodles – Take 1

My first attempt at making snickerdoodles healthier by using applesauce was a great success as a cookie, but not so much as a snickerdoodle. I took the basic recipe and instead of 3/4 cup butter and 1 cup sugar, I added:

  • 1/2 cup applesauce
  • 1/4 + 1/8 cup butter
  • 1/2 cup + 1/8 cup sugar

The batter was really sticky! Until I added the last bit of applesauce, it was a lot like scone batter (very dry and layered). In order to fit all the cookies onto one pan, there were some very large cookies–which was a less than awesome idea. They took a lot longer to cook (about 10 min longer for some of the bigger ones). However! The outcome, while a bit dry and a tad dense, was a tasty-apple cinnamon flavoured cookie (that was a big hit among my friends).

Yes! Just look at all that tasty cookie goodness! The other difference between these cookies is that since they were so much drier, they didn’t melt as much (the mojito attempts were much flatter).

So, what would I change? More applesauce! I think I would go up to 3/4 cup applesauce, with the same reduced levels of butter and sugar. That will be my next try! And after that I’m thinking maybe whole wheat flour. Of course, at that point they may not be snickerdoodles anymore.

Enjoy!

Starting with Snickerdoodles

I can’t see any other way to start this blog than with a cookies recipe. Snickerdoodles were my mom’s favourite recipe, and she even won a baking contest with them. The recipe has been modified a bit from the original Betty Crocker snickerdoodles (I think).

Snickerdoodles

Mix together thoroughly …

  • 3/4 cup butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 egg

Sift together and stir in …

  • 2 cup sifted flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp cream of tartar
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Sugar Mixture

  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 2 tsp cinnamon

Chill dough (optional). Roll into balls the size of walnuts. Then roll each ball in the sugar mixture before placing about 2 inches apart on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake at 400ºF until lightly browned but still soft, approximately 8 – 10 minutes.

As for myself, I never chill the dough, so I would consider it totally unnecessary. But I suppose if you were working in a warm environment, it might be a good idea.

At a craft fair in December, I discovered something miraculous. Flavoured snickerdoodles. There were candycane ones, and chocolate-mocha-y ones. It blew my mind. I decided I needed to try making my own snickerdoodle variations. So, inspired by an etsy store that had mojito flavoured cookies, I decided to make mojito flavoured snickerdoodles.

The modifications were pretty simple. To the wet ingredients, I added 4 finely diced mint leaves and 1 1/2 tbsp lime juice. Instead of the cinnamon mixture, I mixed together approximately equal parts lime juice and sugar and dipped the dough balls in that.

The verdict: the lime-sugar dip worked amazingly. It gave the cookie a bit of tang with each bite. However, I couldn’t really taste the mint or the lime in the cookie itself. I might try adding 1/2 tsp of mint flavouring to the cookies, or perhaps just increasing the number of mint leaves to 6. Oh yeah, and maybe getting a mortar and pestle instead of trying to dice it. With the lime topping though, putting lime juice in the cookie itself is almost unnecessary.

With any luck I will manage to convince myself to make it a second time with modifications. What I would like to try next is cutting down on the butter (and sugar) by substituting in apple sauce. Will post again with the results!

Sarah